Call for Papers

Managing the gap - policy and practice of parents in child care and education

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Special issue editors: Marie Karlsson, Uppsala University, Dept. of Education & Satu Perälä-Littunen, Jyväskylä University, Dept. of Education

During the last two decades we have seen changes in education policy and practice that have reshaped the relationship between parents, preschool and school in the Nordic countries. On the policy level schools/educational institutions are obliged to cooperate with parents and previous research shows that the cooperation is beneficial for the child. While cooperation between parents preschools and schools has been defined as a good thing this area has not been prioritised in educational research. We know little about how the cooperation is carried out in practice. Moreover, in some countries marketization and privatisation of child care and education have together with school choice policies turned parents into consumers of childcare and education in ways that have had impact on the educational landscapes in the Nordic countries. At the same time state policy and practice in child care and education strive to regulate forms and content of child socialisation to promote equality and social justice in line with democratic norms and values. These on-going changes in the policy and practice of child care and education make relevant a managing of a gap between the family and other societal institution engaged in child socialisation. What this gap is about and how to bridge it are questions that need to be addressed by education research in order to shed more light on a relationship that constitutes the very foundation of cultural reproduction within and between nation states.

 

This special issue welcomes contributions that discuss relations between parents, preschool and school from a broad range of perspectives:

a) as practice, as policy, and/or as theory

b) as performed on, for and/or by actors on different levels: the individual, local, regional, national or international

c) as well as studies where the afore mentioned intersect

Contributions should be written in English and we recommend that they should not exceed 7000 words (excl. references). APA referencing conventions should be followed. Manuscripts will undergo peer-review, and will be published if approved by reviewers and accepted by the editorial board.

Important dates:
Deadline for manuscript submission: October 2016
Comments from the editors and reviewers: January 2017
Deadline for final version: April 2017
Expected publication of the special issue edition: July 2017

The paper will be submitted on the journal’s website: www.nordstep.net (open access)

 


Local and regional school history

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Special issue editors: Henrik Román, Stina Hallsén, Andreas Nordin and Johanna Ringarp

Local school history has a very special value because of its authenticity. Such studies may on good grounds claim to come closer to school (the activities taking place there) compared to historical studies restricted to national curricular documents or text books and other educational material. On the other hand, there is a risk that local school history only provides fragments, story-telling of individual cases, disconnected to one another and disconnected to actions and structures at other levels or arenas. In other words, historical studies of local school activities and local policy are essential because they help to problematize, refine and even question the idea of school as a national unit. However, such studies have to be contextualized regionally, nationally and even internationally, as school reforms always (and more and more intensively during the last two centuries) have been related to international trends and ideas.

This special issue aims to emphasize the importance of historical studies of local activities in schools and in local or regional school policy, in order to understand and explain national and international trends and reforms in education. There is a substantial variation in how different local actors, communities and regions have handled national school policy, and furthermore there is a variation in how different countries have taken local variation into account, when executing a national school policy. We invite contributions which empirically and/or theoretically illustrate and investigate local and regional school history in relation to national reform aspirations and effects during the 19th or 20th century.

 

We are interested in a wide range of local school history research covering different

a)      school forms (including both child, youth and adult education);

b)      focal points (e.g. pedagogical, professional and political);

c)      horizontal and/or vertical dimensions (e.g. local, regional, national and international).

Contributions should be written in English and we recommend that they should not exceed 7000 words (excl. references). APA referencing conventions should be followed. Manuscripts will undergo peer-review, and will be published if approved by reviewers and accepted by the editorial board.

Important dates:
Deadline for manuscript submission: 20. January 2017
Comments from the editors and reviewers: May 2017
Deadline for final version: 1. June 2017
Expected publication of the special issue edition: Autumn 2017

The paper will be submitted on the journal’s website: www.nordstep.net (open access)

 


Data use in education: Policies and practices for compliance and for learning

Special issue editors: Tine S. Prøitz, Sølvi Mausethagen and Guri Skedsmo

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In recent years, governing regimes in education that emphasize performance management and accountability have been introduced in several countries. Various types of assessment tools which produce ‘data’ on student performance provide a basis for generating information to be used for policy making and to motivate change in education. Practices of data use are usually defined as what takes place when individuals interact by using test scores, grades, and other forms of assessment tools in their work. Knowledge about the various ways in which data are used by authorities, school leaders, and teachers is therefore crucial to evaluating possible developments in terms of governing education and improving educational practices, yet has to a limited extent been researched within the Nordic context. Knowledge about how these new forms of data is used by different actors will provide insight into the characteristics of so-called evidence informed school governing, and furthermore, address the potential for learning and development that can take place, as well as possible constraints.

In particular, we invite researchers who investigate policies for data use in education, and practices of data use at various levels of education systems to contribute. The title of this special issue implies a certain focus on possible tensions between policy initiatives and policy requirements on the one side, and practices in schools on the other. These tensions are for example the result of the different conditions underlying the practices that take place on the different arenas and also how policy is interpreted and enacted by various actors.

This special issue welcomes contributions that discuss data use in education from a broad range of perspectives:

a)      as practice, as policy, and/or as theory

b)      as performed on, for and/or by actors on different levels: the individual, local, regional, national or international

c)      as well as studies where the afore mentioned intersect

Contributions should be written in English and we recommend that they should not exceed 7000 words (excl. references). APA referencing conventions should be followed. Manuscripts will undergo peer-review, and will be published if approved by reviewers and accepted by the editorial board.

The approval process involves two steps:

1) In the first step, an extended abstract (at least 500 words), presenting rationale, theory and results of the contribution is to be sent in, and approved.

2) In a possible second step, a complete and proof read article is to be sent in and reviewed.

Important dates:
Deadline for abstract submission: 15. May 2016
Deadline for manuscript submission: 15. August 2016
Comments from the editors and reviewers: 15. October 2016
Deadline for final version: 1. December 2016
Expected publication of the special issue edition: February 2017

The abstracts are to be sent to tpr@hbv.no and Solvi.Mausethagen@hioa.no

The paper will be submitted on the journal’s website: www.nordstep.net (open access)

 


Life and Work in Academia

(Call closed)

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Special issue editors: Maja Elmgren (Uppsala University, Sweden), Eva Forsberg (Uppsala University, Sweden) and Lars Geschwind (KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)

The significance of higher education for individuals and society as well as its size and complexity justifies that research on higher education is recognized and developed. In this special issue we focus on academic citizenship and academic work. The work of academics is mostly described in terms of teaching and research. A large number of other activities integral to academic life are often left out and to some degree they appear as less visible aspects of the academic culture. Many of these activities can be related to those duties, responsibilities or virtues of academic faculty that Bruce Macfarlane (2007) includes in academic citizenship. Academics perform services, internal and external, to several overlapping communities – public, discipline-based/professional, institutional, collegial and student service.

With massification, marketization and managerialism higher education institutions face new situations that challenge academic work and our understanding of it. Even though research on academic work has increased it is still rather restricted. With this special issue our aim is to promote the development and dissemination of knowledge on academic citizenship and academic work.

We welcome empirical and theoretical contributions from higher education researchers and scholars from other fields of inquiry with higher education as their object of study. The aim is to explore academic citizenship and academic work through analyses of duties and activities performed by academics as expressed in policy and/or practice. Examples of potential topics and themes include, but are not limited to, analyses of:

  • peer review activities within

         - recruitment and promotion processes
         - journals and their boards
         - research funding bodies
         - evaluations of research, teaching, public outreach and administration
         - examination processes of doctoral thesis

  • academic leadership and management as well as administration at different levels
  • higher education training and supervision courses for academics
  • academics work within research units, seminars and with conferences
  • collegial support activities and care
  • popular science and outreach activities
  • advisory roles for external stakeholders

Contributions should be written in English and with a recommendation of maximum 7000 words (references excluded). APA referencing conventions should be followed. Manuscripts will undergo peer-review, and will be published if approved by reviewers and accepted by the editorial board.

The approval process involves three steps:

1) In the first step, an extended abstract (at least 500 words), presenting rationale, theory and results of the contribution is to be sent in, and approved.

2) In a possible second step, a complete and proof read article is to be sent in and reviewed.

3) If approved the third step involves submission of a revised and final version of the manuscript.

Important dates and anticipated timeline:
Deadline for abstract proposal submission:  November 1st 2015
Invitation to submit complete manuscript: December 1st 2015
Deadline for manuscript submission: March 14th 2016
Comments from the editors and reviewers:  May 9th 2016
Deadline for final version: October 10th 2016
Anticipated publication of the special issue edition: November 2016

The abstract proposal is to be sent to the Special Issue editors: maja.elmgren@kemi.uu.se , eva.forsberg@edu.uu.se and larsges@kth.se

Inquiries about this special issue can be made to either of the Special Issue editors. More general questions can be addressed to the executive editor wieland.wermke@edu.uu.se

Accepted paper will be submitted on the journal’s website: www.nordstep.net